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Question Answer
Sitting Bull A Native American leader of the Sioux tribe in the late 19th century. He was a chief and medicine man when the Sioux took up arms against settlers in the northern Great Plains and against United States army troops.
Navajo a member of a Native American people originally from New Mexico and Arizona. the language of navajo people
Bureau of Indian Affairs an agency of the federal government of the United States within the U.S. Department of the Interior. The BIA's responsibilities include providing health care to American Indians and Alaska Natives.
Sand Creek Massacre Attack by U.S. army troops in which some 200 peaceful Cheyenne were killed in Colorado.
A Century of Dishonor non-fiction book by Helen Hunt Jackson first published in 1881 that chronicled the experiences of Native Americans in the United States, focusing on injustices.
Massacre at Wounded Knee U.S armys killing of about 300 Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota; ended U.S.- American Indian wars o the Great Plains.
Dawes General Allotment Act Legislation that required that American Indians lands be surveyed and Indian families be given allotment of 160 acres, with the remaining land sold; resulted in the loss of two thirds of American Indian land.
George Armstrong Custer A United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the American Indian Wars.
Battle Of Little Bighorn Battle between U.S. soldiers, lead by George Armstrong Custer, and Sioux warriors; worst U.S. army defeat in the West.
Nez Perce An American Indian tribe of the Pacific Northwest, the Nez Perce came to Oklahoma as prisoners of war in 1878. More than one hundred died in Indian Territory before the tribe returned to its homeland in 1885.
What did the U.S. government give American Indians in exchange for their land? promised some money and guarantees that the reservation lands would be theirs forever and yearly supplies for 30 years; however as settlers demanded more land and U.S. often resigned on promises, taking away land and not delivering promised supplies
How did the Sand Creek Massacre lead to new treaties? caused raids by the Arapaho and Cheyenne across the plains and the Sioux stepped up their attacks; as result U.S. govt. created a new peace commission; new treaties Treaty of Medicine Lodge; Treaty of Fort Laramie
Bureau of Indian Affairs an agency of the federal government of the United States within the U.S. Department of the Interior. The BIA's responsibilities include providing health care to American Indians and Alaska Natives.
Sand Creek Massacre Attack by U.S. army troops in which some 200 peaceful Cheyenne were killed in Colorado.
A Century of Dishonor non-fiction book by Helen Hunt Jackson first published in 1881 that chronicled the experiences of Native Americans in the United States, focusing on injustices.
Massacre at Wounded Knee U.S armys killing of about 300 Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota; ended U.S.- American Indian wars o the Great Plains.
Dawes General Allotment Act Legislation that required that American Indians lands be surveyed and Indian families be given allotment of 160 acres, with the remaining land sold; resulted in the loss of two thirds of American Indian land.
George Armstrong Custer A United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the American Indian Wars.
Battle Of Little Bighorn Battle between U.S. soldiers, lead by George Armstrong Custer, and Sioux warriors; worst U.S. army defeat in the West.
Nez Perce An American Indian tribe of the Pacific Northwest, the Nez Perce came to Oklahoma as prisoners of war in 1878. More than one hundred died in Indian Territory before the tribe returned to its homeland in 1885.
What did the U.S. government give American Indians in exchange for their land? promised some money and guarantees that the reservation lands would be theirs forever and yearly supplies for 30 years; however as settlers demanded more land and U.S. often resigned on promises, taking away land and not delivering promised supplies
How did the Sand Creek Massacre lead to new treaties? caused raids by the Arapaho and Cheyenne across the plains and the Sioux stepped up their attacks; as result U.S. govt. created a new peace commission; new treaties Treaty of Medicine Lodge; Treaty of Fort Laramie
What events led to the end of conflict between the Plains Indians and the U.S. government? fear of the Ghost Dance movement promoted arrests of Sitting Bull and skirmishes which led to the massacre at wounded knee; also the end of the buffalo herds that the indians depended on for food, clothing and shelter
How did American Indians resist and protest white Americans' treatment of them in the late 1800s? raids; fleeing and making raids.
Why did attempts to force the Plains Indians to become farmers fail? land on the reservations wasn't suitable for farming; much land was lost and sold off once it was parceled off to individual families.

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